At the Ballet

Ballet Austin Presents

Snow White

featuring Ballet Austin II

World-premiere choreography propels this timeless fairytale and answers the question, who is the fairest one of all?

Choreography by Nelly van Bommel

Performed by Ballet Austin II

AustinVentures StudioTheater
2pm | Feb 23-24 & March 2-3
4:30pm | Feb 23-24 & March 2-3

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About


Ballet Austin's world premiere of Snow White is a spirited retelling of the classic Grimm's fairy tale with new choreography by Nelly van Bommel. 

Ms. van Bommel's 2012 World Premiere of Hansel and Gretel for Ballet Austin II was an instant family favorite. The Austin American Statesman hailed it "as visually vibrant as it is physically playful" and an introduction to the arts that "encourages reaction and reflection." van Bommel is sure to bring the same energy, fun, and new twists to this familiar classic.
 
Choreography by Nelly van Bommel
Performed by Ballet Austin II
 
 
AustinVentures StudioTheater
2pm  |  Feb 23, 24 & March 2, 3
4:30pm |  Feb 23, 24 & March 2, 3



Program Notes



Synopsis

Long ago a kind queen wished for a daughter with skin white as snow, lips red as blood, and hair black as ebony. The childwas born to her and the king and named Snow White. Soon after, the queen died.
 
Later, the king remarried. The new queen was beautiful, proud, and arrogant. Each morning she consulted her magic mirror: "Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who in this land is fairest of all?" Each morning, the mirror answered, "You, my queen, are fairest of all." However, one morning the magic mirror replied: "You, my queen, are fair; it is true. But Snow White is a thousand times fairer than you." Snow White escapes the enraged and jealous queen by fleeing into the woods.
 
The frightened Snow White discovers a little house in the forest, inhabited by seven dwarves. They agree to let her stay in exchange for taking care of their house. .
 
Of course, the next day the queen asks who is fairest. The magic mirror reveals that the girl is still alive. In disguise, the queen visits the home of the seven dwarves, and gives the girl a poisoned apple. Snow White bites the apple and falls into a death-like sleep.
 
The dwarves put Snow White to rest in a glass coffin on a mountainside. A passing prince is so moved by the sight that he take her to his castle, with a promise to honor her as his most cherished one. Through the prince’s love, Snow White is brought back to life and the two are married in a forest celebration.



History

The story of Snow White has a history as an oral folktale, passed down by word of mouth in many European countries. The most famous version was collected by the Grimm Brothers in their 1812 Kinder- und Hausmärchen (Children’s and Household Tales). This tale includes many elements familiar to modern audiences: the magic mirror, poisoned apple, glass coffin, and seven dwarves.
 
Some changes were made between the first and second editions of the Grimm’s tales. In the original tale, the wicked queen was Snow White’s own mother. Apparently the Grimms, their editors, or readers thought this was too appalling, so in the second edition, the mother dies in childbirth and is replaced by a step mother. Also, in the original tale, a disgruntled  servant strikes the sleeping Snow White, causing the poison apple to be dislodged. The later version has the servant accidentally stumble, with a bump dislodging the apple.
 
The dwarves were first given names (Blick, Flick, Glick, Snick, Plick, Whick, and Quee) in the 1912 Broadway version of the tale. The 1937 Disney movie changed the names to those familiar names of Doc, Grumpy, Happy, Sleepy, Bashful, Sneezy, and Dopey, and added distinct personalities to match.
 
One possible real-life origin of the Snow White tale is Maria Sophia Margaretha Catherina von Erthal in early eighteenth-century Bavaria. After the death of her mother, her father remarried a rather domineering woman who did not care much for the children of the first marriage. A famous “Talking Mirror” is on display in a museum housed in the castle where Maria Sopia was born.



Music



Costumes



Sets




Cast & Credits


Cast



Credits

Choreography by Nelly van Bommel
Performed by Ballet Austin II



Artist Profiles

Nelly van Bommel, Choreographer
Nelly van Bommel was cited in Dance Magazine in 2010 as "1 of 25 to Watch" and is the Artistic Director of NØA DANCE in New York City. She received her training at the Académie de Danse Claudie Plaçais-Rocher and the Centre National de la Danse in Paris. She performed throughout Europe and North Africa with French choreographer Claudine Peny. In addition to her performing career, she also attended Université de Paris VIII -Sorbonne (France) and graduated with an MA in Comparative Literature.

Ms. van Bommel is a co-founder of the annual Reverb Dance Festival at the Alvin Ailey Theater in NYC. Her choreography has been featured in France, Taiwan, Canada, and the US in major festivals and venues.

Ms. van Bommel is currently on faculty in the Conservatory of Dance at Purchase College, State University of New York. She was a finalist in Ballet Austin's New American Talent/Dance 2010 choreographic competition, where she was nominated for two Austin Critics' Table Awards in 2009-10 (best choreographer and best short work) for her folk tale-influenced piece, Fanfarnèta.


Ballet Austin II
Funded in part by the generosity of Sarah & Ernest Butler through a Ballet Austin Foundation Endowment
Established in 1999, Ballet Austin II is Ballet Austin's apprentice program and second company. The 10 apprentices, ranging in age from 18-23, are recruited through a competitive national audition process. They perform with the main company in large productions and present at least two independent projects per year, including biennial performances of Stephen Mills' Peter and the Wolf and Not Afraid of the Dark - The Show that Glows! in collaboration with Joe Scruggs. Choreographers currently represented in the Ballet Austin II repertoire include Stephen Mills, Jennifer Hart and Nick Kepley, as well as New American Talent/Dance choreographic competition winners Thang Dao, Thaddeus Davis, Viktor Kabaniaev, and Nelly van Bommel.

Currently, more than 65% of Ballet Austin's main company roster are graduates of Ballet Austin II Former Ballet Austin II dancers have also joined the ranks of both ballet and modern dance companies, including Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, Smuin Ballet, Nashville Ballet, Dayton Ballet, Washington Ballet, Nai-Ni Chen, The Suzanne Farrell Ballet, Ballet Met, Kansas City Ballet, Kim Robards Dance Company, Dominic Walsh Dance Theater, Wideman/Davis Dance, and Thang Dao Dance.


Director's Notes


Reviews


Events


Family Dance Workshop – Snow White
Sun Feb 10, 2013  |  2:30 – 4pm
Ballet Austin’s AustinVentures StudioTheater

See excerpts from the world premiere of Ballet Austin’s Snow White, and create your own choreography with the help of Ballet Austin dancers. Recommended for children ages 3 to 10 years old and their family members. Learn more or sign up.

Get TicketsAustinVentures StudioTheater
2pm | Feb 23, 24 & March 2, 3
4:30pm | Feb 23, 24 & March 2, 3
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