Tag Archives: Austin

Taming of the Shrew casting

Welcome back, everyone! Our 2012/13 season kicks off in a little more than four weeks with Shakespeare’s hilarious Taming of the Shrew. Don’t worry – you’re allowed to laugh in the theater. See below for casting.

austin dance ballet austin taming of the shrew

Aara Krumpe / Jaime Lynn Witts

Ashley Lynn Gilfix / Anne Marie Melendez

Paul Michael Bloodgood / Frank Shott

Christopher Swaim
James Fuller
Jordan Moser

Vincent Sandoval

Street Women
Michelle Thompson / Oren Porterfield
Beth Terwilleger / Chelsea Renner

Elise Pekarek
Rebecca Johnson
Brittany Strickland
Kirby Wallis

Ian Bethany
Michael Burfield
Edward Carr
Orlando Canova
Preston Patterson
Ben Wetzel

Dancer Preview #1: Romeo & Juliet

Getting into character and perfect technique – See what Paul Michael Bloodgood says about preparing for Romeo & Juliet.

Performing “in character” is one of my favorite parts of dancing any full-length story ballet such as Romeo & Juliet. Similar to an acting role in film or theatre, trying to embody the emotions and thoughts of a character helps me to interpret the dance choreography for that role into movement that translates to the audience.

Neither character development nor ballet technique is more important to me in a story ballet – they are of equal substance to fulfilling the presentation. If the acting is terrible, the audience isn’t going to care about the relationship between Romeo and Juliet, even if both dancers are technically flawless. On the flip side, bad technique would be equally distracting and pull the audience out of the scene.  Although the average observer might think one is more important than the other, to me it’s like cake and frosting: they complement each other perfectly.

Personally, getting “in character” for a role like Romeo involves reading the source material and watching films and ballet productions of the story, then finding my own voice or interpretation of the role. Although I try to transform into the character as much as possible, I believe bringing my own life experience to a role separates it from other iterations of the part.

Ashley (my Juliet) and I have spoken about the intimacies of our characters in depth, but we let ourselves laugh about it all, too. We’ve been great friends for ten years, and having the opportunity to perform Romeo & Juliet with my “stage wife” as she’s been nicknamed, makes our onstage relationship come full circle. Plus, it doesn’t hurt that she’s best friends with my real wife, Anne – a fellow dancer with Ballet Austin and one of Juliet’s friends in the production.

As we head into our last week in the rehearsal studio before production week, I am looking forward to running the three acts in succession to get a good grasp on the pacing and stamina required of me. Also on the check list are little things like trying to dance the piece in Romeo’s leather boots, working out any pas de deux kinks that may result from Juliet’s costumes and rehearsing to the live accompaniment from Austin Symphony Orchestra.

It’s all just a part of preparing for the show.


Catch Paul onstage as Romeo on Saturday, May 12. Tickets.

Have you read Dancer Preview #2? Read it here.

Paul, Ashley and Michelle Thompson will be live-tweeting backstage during performance weekend. Follow us (and them) at twitter.com/balletaustin.


Inside the Costume Shop

Romeo & Juliet is without a doubt a beautiful production – expressive emotion, mesmerizing movement and, of course, bejeweled costumes. Take a peek…

ballet austin romeo and juliet costumes

Costumes are organized on the rack by Company member. Dancers change frequently during the production, but the largest quick change is the 18-person switch from the Market scene to the Ballroom scene.

ballet austin romeo and juliet costumes

In last week’s Romeo & Juliet by the Numbers, we revealed a handful of facts about the costumes. Here is Lady Capulet’s (Michelle Martin, Associate Artistic Director) Ballroom Gown. Supported by two hangers, this beauty weighs a total of 30lbs.

romeo and juliet ballet austin costumes

The gown, filled with intricate detailing, would cost several thousand dollars to replace. It is due to the expense of replacing costumes like this one that wardrobe does their best to repair each piece in the weeks leading up to the performance. For Lady Capulet’s 3 dresses, including this one, our two wardrobe people spent 4 days on alterations.

romeo and juliet ballet austin costumes

When wardrobe began to repair the costumes 4 weeks ago, they discovered that many of the buttons, brooches and bejeweled adornments featuring rhinestones were in need of repair. In the buttons above, they replaced each of the individual rhinestones.
(Ed note: They’ve since blocked this day from their memory.)

ballet austin romeo and juliet costumes

Ashley Lynn Gilfix, one of our Juliets, gets fitted for her costume by Wardrobe Master Alexey Korygin. Here they talk about adjusting the gathering in the fabric on her arms.

ballet austin romeo and juliet costumes

The costume shop keeps detailed records of every dancer’s measurements. Once ballets are cast, dancers are assigned costumes based on their measurements, and fittings and alterations then proceed from there.

ballet austin romeo and juliet costumes

In Juliet’s costume, they replaced all of the pearls and metallic fabric insert that runs down the sleeve. Metallic fabric can tarnish, and when these were pulled out of storage the shiny gold fabric you see now was green.

ballet austin romeo and juliet costumes

Tybalt’s costume (played by Ed Carr), needed to have the entire underarm replaced. If you look closely, you can just see the slight difference in fabrics.

ballet austin romeo and juliet costumes

For our Romeos’ (Paul and Frank) costumes, all of the sleeve grommets were replaced. Other alterations include re-soling shoes, as well as button, bead and snap replacements. The shop never cuts costumes; they only fold, adjust, pin and sew so as to extend the garment’s lifespan.


Romeo & Juliet opens May 11-13. Tickets selling fast.

Special thank you to Wardrobe Master Alexey Korygin, and Wardrobe Asst. & Shoe Manager Jamie Urban.

Dancer Meals – What’s For Dinner?

Ever wondered how dancers fuel their body throughout the day, while still staying calorie conscious? Look no further than the recipes below.


Brittany Strickland:

A typical…

  • Breakfast: a piece of homemade bread toasted with peanut butter and jam, scrambled eggs, possibly some berries or part of a banana, and coffee
  • Lunch: a sandwich – turkey and cheese being a common go-to option – or dinner leftovers
  • Dinner: some sort of protein such as chicken or fish, accompanied by a grain and vegetable combo

Breakfast Recipe – 100% Whole Wheat Nut and Seed Bread

  • 1 1/3 cups lukewarm water
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 5 tablespoons honey, molasses or maple syrup
  • 4 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1/4 cup sunflower seeds, chopped*
  • 1/4 cup walnuts, chopped*
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons instant yeast

To prepare the dough: Combine all of the ingredients, and mix them until you have a shaggy dough. Let the dough rest, covered, for 20 minutes, then knead till fairly smooth. Allow the dough to rise, covered, for about 2 hours, or until it’s puffy and nearly doubled in bulk.

Gently deflate the dough, shape it into a log, and place it in a lightly greased 8 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ bread pan. Cover the pan with lightly greased plastic wrap (or a clear shower cap), and allow it to rise for about 2 hours, till it’s crowned about 1″ to 2″ over the rim of the pan.

Bake the bread in a preheated 350°F oven for 40 to 45 minutes, tenting it lightly with aluminum foil for the final 20 minutes of baking. Yield: 1 loaf.


Anne Marie Melendez:

A typical…

  • Breakfast: coffee and oatmeal with a handful of blueberries or some other fruit
  • Lunch: sandwich with pesto, sliced mozzarella, Roma tomatoes, and something leafy on two slices of homemade whole wheat bread
  • Dinner: pasta with marinara sauce, ground turkey (or grilled chicken) and possibly some cooked broccoli or spinach mixed in at the end, a salad with crumbled feta and kalamata olives, and a baguette fresh out of the oven
  • Snacks: Greek yogurt, almonds and fruit are great for workday pick-me-ups

Lunch Recipe – Homemade Wheat Bread

  • 7 cups whole wheat all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Yeast
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt (increase or decrease to taste)
  • 1/4 cup Vital wheat gluten

Mixed into a food safe but not airtight container, add and mix in:

  • 3 & 1/4 cups lukewarm water
  • 1/2 cup of honey (You can also use only water instead of honey)

Don’t over-mix, this is a no-knead recipe!

Leave container of dough covered, out on the counter for 2+ hours to allow it to rise, and then put it in the refrigerator. You can use the dough piece by piece for up to two weeks.

Pull off a cantaloupe-sized chunk of dough, shape it into a ball, then elongate it a bit into an oval and toss it into a loaf pan. Let it rest (loosely covered with plastic wrap) for 90 minutes and then bake it at 350 degrees for 50-60 minutes. Note: If you use only water you’ll have to adjust baking time and temperature, but the process is essentially the same.

After letting the loaf cool, slice it up to have sandwich bread for the week!


Ed Carr:

A typical…

  • Breakfast: a bowl of cereal, some juice, and a banana
  • Lunch: leftovers, or a sandwich or something else quick from a nearby restaurant. Can’t miss homemade Thai food from Royal Blue Grocery on Fridays!
  • Dinner: simple and quick meals for dinner, with enough for a few days of leftovers
  • Snacks: fruit, yogurt, trail mix, and chocolate milk

Dinner Recipe – Ed’s Simple Stir Fry

  • 6 tablespoons soy sauce (or to taste)
  • 2 tablespoons minced ginger
  • 2 (or more) cloves of garlic, minced
  • Optional: crushed red chilies, rice vinegar, teriyaki/Sriracha/hoisin/oyster sauce, etc.
  • sesame or other neutral oil (for use over high heat)
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 1 lb. tofu (or another protein), cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 6 cups assorted vegetables chopped into similar shapes/sizes
  • A splash of water, stock or white wine

First, prepare the sauce by combining the soy sauce, ginger, garlic, and whatever else you like in a small bowl. Taste, adjust, and set aside to let the flavors meld.

At this point it’s best to prepare all the other ingredients and have them ready by the stove.

Heat a tablespoon or so of oil in a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook for a minute or two, stirring occasionally. When the onion begins to soften, add the protein and cook until the tofu begins to brown or the meat is almost fully cooked.

Add a splash of the sauce and cook, stirring frequently, until the tofu is nicely browned or the meat is done. Remove the onion and protein and set aside. Return the pan to the heat and add another tablespoon of oil. When the oil is hot, add the vegetables and turn the heat to high. Add the splash of liquid and cook, stirring constantly, until the vegetables are tender.

Turn off the heat and return the onion/protein mixture to the pan along with the rest of the sauce. Stir until evenly mixed and heated through. Serve immediately over rice or noodles, and save the leftovers for lunch!


You can see Brittany, Anne Marie and Ed in all of their well-fed glory, May 11-13 in Romeo & Juliet. Tickets here.

Hansel and Gretel – Artistic Preview

Associate Artistic Director, Michelle Martin, discusses how one choreographer’s personality, background and constant curiosity combine to make Hansel and Gretel a ballet you won’t forget.

Nelly van Bommel’s Hansel and Gretel, is one of those rare examples of a work that appeals across generations, and its success is as much a reflection of her energy and sense of humor as it is of her choreographic talent. Nelly’s curiosity provides her with a limitless pool of inspiration, and she draws on her background in street theater, and modern dance technique to express her discoveries.

I came to know Nelly through Ballet Austin’s biennial choreographic competition, New American Talent/Dance. She was one of the three finalists in 2010 and I spent two weeks in the studio with her as she created a new work, Fanfarneta, for our main company.  As she worked, I was fascinated by her interest in human interaction and her eye for nuance, particularly within interpersonal  encounters. I thought her highly theatrical aesthetic would be a wonderful match for a narrative work, and her collaborative approach would provide a rich experience for the dancers in Ballet Austin II. I was thrilled when she accepted our invitation to create Hansel and Gretel.

Nelly’s work on Hansel and Gretel began with a series of facilitated games for the dancers. Some were based on movement and others involved vocalization. Through this process she began to know the dancers as individuals, in terms of both physicality and personality; and from this foundation, she matched each dancer with her ideas of the characters from Hansel and Gretel.  Using the movement from her games, she crafted the dance portions of the piece first. Set to a series of traditional German folk songs, they’re high energy and playful, establishing her whimsical perspective on the story and its characters. The narrative scenes, particularly with the Witch, Hansel and Gretel, and their parents, were made in a very collaborative way – the dancers contributed to the development of the characters and the progression of the story. Nelly’s unique perspective is interspersed throughout the ballet with quirky interjections of props that are brilliantly out of context and absolutely hilarious – a wildly retro vacuum cleaner, baskets of apples and mountains of marshmallows .

Hansel and Gretel – Dancer Preview #1

Kody Jauron, “Hansel”, lets us in on why Hansel and Gretel isn’t your mother’s fairy tale.

I’ve thoroughly enjoyed being a part of the creation of Hansel and Gretel! Working with choreographer Nelly van Bommel has been an enjoyable and memorable experience. Nelly is whimsical, playful, theatrical, and innovative. Her sprightly personality is reflected in the choreography of this production, the theatricality she built into each individual character, and the fantasy world that she invented.

This is not your mother’s Hansel and Gretel. For starters, the story takes place in the 1950s.  Hansel and Gretel are not expelled from their house because their parents cannot afford to feed them; instead, the two run away from home after accidentally breaking their mother’s most prized possession; her vacuum. Children can also look forward to a newcomer to the story, the forest fairy!

Perfect for the entire family, Hansel and Gretel has something for everyone. Kids will enjoy the fun-loving characters and seeing a familiar fairy tale translated on stage. Adults will appreciate the cutting edge choreography and unique movement quality.

This is definitely a Hansel and Gretel you won’t forget.

Get tickets to Hansel and Gretel here.

NAT/D: Dancer Preview #3

For our third dancer preview, we asked Orlando Julius Canova to discuss what it’s like to perform in an all-male piece.

The rumor the day Bradley Shelver arrived to cast the dancers was that Bradley was going to do a ballet only using men. Since the inception of New American Talent/Dance, no choreographer has chosen to only use men. The rumors were finally put to rest when he excused all the ladies and auditioned the ten men of Ballet Austin. In the audition that ensued we were asked to yell, tumble, and push our bodies to their physical limit. I knew that when Bradley returned to choreograph on his cast of men, it would mean one thing… PAIN.

The first day Bradley returned to choreograph, he began like a racehorse out of the starting gate. His stride was swift, and his steps were confident. From day one, Bradley was incredibly organized and sure of what he wanted. Some choreographers begin to piece work together after getting to know their dancers, but Bradley had no time for that – his brain was bursting at the seams with the ballet that danced in his mind. Bradley began to set his work immediately, and within the first day, four minutes and twenty two seconds of the ballet were choreographed.

Bradley’s entire residency continued in this pace. Bradley had a schedule and no matter how grueling and difficult, he stuck to it. Every day, I went home battered and bruised both mentally and physically. After a week of floor burn, swollen knees, and bruised thighs the ballet was finished. Let me reiterate: Bradley Shelver finished his ballet in only a WEEK.

Though done in only a week,   with six sections, two solos, and even a pas de deux, the ballet does not lack for anything. I believe that the bonds of camaraderie between the men of Ballet Austin have grown stronger. The work that took place in AustinVentures StudioTheater was focused and dedicated, and because of this Bradley’s piece is filled with anxiety, tension, beauty, athleticism, grace, and strength. This piece makes me proud to be a man of Ballet Austin.

Today is the last day of Bradley Shelver’s residency. As I write this blog I am well aware of the crick in my neck, the scabs on my feet, and the pain in my muscles. I am also well aware of the satisfaction that all these ailments give me. Bradley pushed and coached the men of Ballet Austin to the brink of insanity. When we had nothing left to give, he wanted more. When the curtain goes up on Feb, the men of Ballet Austin will give the audience more than they ever knew they could.

Tickets on sale now for New American Talent/Dance.

NAT/D Dancer Preview #2

Improvisation, “ugly” movements and commands. James Fuller discusses Loni Landon’s choreography style.

Loni Landon started her choreographic residency at Ballet Austin by asking me and the other dancers in her piece to close our eyes and explore our feet. I turned my feet out and in, rolled my weight onto my heels and then onto to the tops of my arches and crossed my feet so far that I could barely move. In ballet class, all of these positions would have been horribly wrong, but Loni wanted us to find ways of moving that would normally feel awkward or ugly. She explained that movements that feel awkward and ugly can be fresh, interesting and beautiful in ways that traditional steps can’t.

From our feet, we moved up gradually into our knees, hips, torso, head and finally arms. After giving each part of our body its due, we started to work with each other, first in pairs and then as a group. One of us would call out a command like “freeze”, “collapse” or “rescue”, and the other dancers would respond. We soon discovered that much of Loni’s choreography was like these commands: very specific but also open to many interpretations.

The last exercise Loni gave was to perform a short solo about ourselves. She encouraged us to both speak and dance. Everyone was nervous, but the results were magical. We danced and talked about our childhoods, our years of training, our relationships and our quirks. In just a few minutes, I learned things about my coworkers that I would never have dreamed. Loni gave us this assignment because she wanted to get to know us. She wanted our personalities to be part of her piece.

For the next few days, we learned phrases and created short group dances. I found this part of the process difficult both because of the volume of material and because Loni’s approach to movement is very different from ours. Loni approaches movement holistically, and wanted us to grasp her material’s shape, dynamic and intent simultaneously. At Ballet Austin, we usually approach movement more analytically. We break down the mechanics of each step, figure out when each step happens, and after all that work is done, we think about intent. I found it very hard to break myself out of this pattern. Loni would ask me to perform her movement with full dynamic and intent before I had had a chance to break it down and assimilate it.

Fortunately, as the piece gradually came together, I started to feel more comfortable in Loni’s movement. The piece is dark and smooth, but I can see glimpses of our jagged improvisations and cheerful solos in it. It’s fascinating to see two weeks of improvisation, tension and sharing woven into a piece.

Tickets on sale now for New American Talent/Dance.

NAT/D: Dancer Preview #1

New American Talent/Dance benefits choreographers and dancers alike. See how company dancer Beth Terwilleger learned to speak a new language.

A dance career is often too short, therefore the work that goes into it must be intense and full of passion in order to squeeze as much out of it as possible. Any chance to work with a new artist or choreographer is a gift that promises the opportunity to grow in many ways. I am lucky enough to dance for a company that not only has a director who challenges and allows his dancers to grow with his work, but one that also brings in artists to add to the richness of the company’s dancers and repertoire.

New American Talent/Dance allows for choreographers with a variety of voices and interpretations of movement to come into the world of Ballet Austin and help us grow. I feel very lucky to be a part of this project and constantly try to embrace the opportunity. With every choreographer, it is like turning into a sponge and soaking up as much as I can from the experience. Every choreographer I have worked with for NAT/D has spoken a new and different language. Some you will learn to speak better than others and some you may feel like you actually speak a little of already, but there is always a great amount of opportunity for growth.

This year I was chosen by Greg Dolbashian to be a part of his creative process and dance in his piece for NAT/D 2012. The experience of working with Greg was one that was truly unique to my dance career. Never, while growing up in a classical dance training environment, did I ever imagine I would be asked to explore the movement possibilities of dancing improvisational work, eyes closed, onstage during a performance. And this, exactly, is what Gregory asked me to do.  The improvisational work in Greg’s piece is heavily inspired by his own choreographic voice and movement style.  Greg’s language is unique and inspiring, but  it was also exceptionally challenging ; attempting to speak his language was no easy task.  Watching him move and hearing his deep understanding of movement and the emotion and the art that goes behind it allowed for me to fearlessly dive into his rehearsals. While I still feel I have a lot of work do to before I could even scrape the surface of what he is trying to pull from me as an artist, I know I have already really grown from the experience.

The beauty of a project like NAT/D is the opportunity for growth for all involved.  Not only do the dancers gain from it, but the choreographers are given a group of artists willing to explore with them and, ultimately, help them develop as well. The dancers grow, the choreographers grow, and Ballet Austin as an organization grows and benefits greatly as well. This type of support in the art world is imperative for growth, and the more we all support each other, the stronger the art world will be.


Tickets on sale now for New American Talent/Dance.